Zoning, Tenant Harassment, and the Property Contradiction: Lessons from the Special Clinton District

Sean Meehan

Click here for a recommended citation and to download a paginated PDF version of this article.

Landlord harassment against low-income, rent-regulated tenants is an enduring problem in New York City that forces vulnerable tenants from their homes as landlords illegally pursue greater profits. Protection from harassment was a significant issue during Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s unprecedented land use revision of nearly 140 rezonings from 2002 to 2014.[1] As communities throughout the city began to understand the inequitable effects of rezoning, particularly for low-income communities of color,[2] many tenants and community groups began to organize and demand greater protection from the anticipated effects that rezoning would have on their communities.

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First Toast

GETTING PUBLISHED

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Join the CUNY Law Review to find out more about the process of writing, submitting, and publishing with the CUNY Law Review.

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Symposium 2017: Transformative Immigration Defense

On Friday, March 31, 2017, the City University of New York Law Review will be hosting a Symposium entitled: Transformative Immigration Defense: Law in Support of an Intersectional Movement.

Below is more detailed information regarding the Symposium.

  1. Event Information
  2. Location
  3. Panelists
  4. Keynote
  5. Program
  6. RSVP
  7. CLE Credits
  8. Social Media
  9. Co-Sponsors

If you have additional questions please email us at: cunylr@mail.law.cuny.edu.

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New Board Members Announced

Congratulations to the 2017 – 2018
CUNY Law Review Board!

Jellisa Grant
Chris Kovalski
Executive Articles Editors

Anna Maria Goyzueta
Shaina Low
Public Interest Practitioner Section (PIPS) Editors

Zunira Elahi
Samara Yousif
Notes & Comments Editors

Princess Masilungan
Rafael Varela
Footnote Forum Editors

Maria Brinkmann
Special Events Editor

Randy Yang
Community Engagement Editor

Mackenzie Lew
JP Perry
Managing Articles Editors

Susannah Maltz
Managing Editor

Lovely Bonhomme
Editor-in-Chief

Family Defense in the Age of Black Lives Matter

Erin Cloud, Rebecca Oyama & Lauren Teichner[1]

Click here for a recommended citation and to download a paginated PDF version of this article.

One hundred years from now, today’s child welfare system will surely be condemned as a racist institution—one that compounded the effects of discrimination on Black families by taking children from their parents, allowing them to languish in a damaging foster care system or to be adopted by more privileged people. School children will marvel that so many scholars and politicians defended this devastation of Black families in the name of protecting Black children. The color of America’s child welfare system is the reason Americans have tolerated its destructiveness.

Dorothy Roberts, Shattered Bonds (2012)

“Black people love their children with a kind of obsession. You are all we have, and you come to us endangered.”

Ta-Nehisi Coates, Between the World and Me (2015)

Introduction[2]

All families have a constitutional right to be together, free from the unwarranted interference of third parties, particularly the state. This is an intrinsic human right that encompasses the right of parents to the “custody, care and nurture of [their] child[ren]”[3] and the parallel right of children to be raised by and live with their parents.[4] This fundamental right recognizes the inherent value in family ties, which provide a connection to culture and identity, and serve as a protective social bond. Of course, the government must be permitted to pursue measures to ensure the protection – and even the adoption – of children for whom it is ultimately deemed too unsafe to return home. But any such interference into the family structure, particularly the drastic step of taking children from their families, should be the exception to the rule and not the norm of child protective practices.

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Transformative Immigration Defense: Law in Support of an Intersectional Movement

This spring, the CUNY Law Review will host a Symposium exploring the role of legal practitioners at the intersection of aggressive federal immigration enforcement and emerging people’s movements for racial, economic, and social justice. Responding to a dramatic expansion of the deportation and criminal enforcement infrastructure in the United States in recent decades, multiracial movements from #BlackLivesMatter to #Not1More continue to organize, march, and build toward a more just future.

Organizing and legal action have reached a fever pitch following executive actions by the Trump administration. As thousands of Americans take to the streets to combat these racist and xenophobic policies, this Symposium asks how members of the legal community can be part of an alternative vision for the future in which we can all be free.

By bringing together legal practitioners and organizers working on the front lines of multiple justice movements, this Symposium will explore what works (and what does not work) in past and current legal interventions. We will also ask how legal practitioners can best work in collaboration with intersectional movements for racial, gender, economic, and social justice towards a transformative and expansive vision for immigrant defense.

The Symposium is free and open to the public. Lunch and a concluding reception will be provided. Please RSVP here.

CLE credit available.

 

 

Call for Papers for Publication

cfp-for-word-press-copy

Download the Call for Papers here.

2016 First Toast!

Come join us and toast to all of the hard work the outgoing 2015-2016 CUNY Law Review Board did this year and send well wishes to the incoming 2016-2017 CUNY Law Review Board!

 

LABOUR STANDARDS IN INTERNATIONAL LAW: ALL STATES SHOULD HAVE AN OBLIGATION TO PUNISH MISCONDUCTS OF MULTINATIONAL ENTERPRISES UNDER INTERNATIONAL CUSTOMARY LAW

Andrea Scozzaro*

Click here for a recommended citation and to download a paginated PDF version of this article.

Introduction

This article addresses the issues of unethical employment practices and lack of fair labor standards in developing countries. The discussion on such problems, although ongoing since the 1970s, is still of primary importance both within the scholarly community and the wider public. The fact that big, multinational enterprises of developed countries still engage in violations of workers’ rights is certainly stunning, yet not so surprising given the connections between such violations and the current structure of the global economy. In the wake of a nearly fifty-years-old process of globalization, the worldwide implementation of competition rules in the labor market stimulates “race to the bottom” outcomes, with millions of workers in developing countries suffering from slavery-like working conditions, wages below subsistence level, and inhumane treatments.

Despite the progress made in the field of labor protection thanks to private and governmental initiatives in the last several decades, the current legal tools used to avoid massive workers’ rights violations have been proven ineffective. This is due to the apparently unsolvable friction that exists between the huge economic power of enterprises and the desperate need for economic support of developing countries.

 

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