CUNY Law Review 17.2 Author, G. Flint Taylor’s Article in In These Times

 

CUNY Law Review 17.2 Author, G. Flint Taylor’s Article in In These Times 

CUNY Law Review 17.2 author, G. Flint Taylor recently published an article with In These Times focusing on Chicago Police Commander Jon Burge which he discusses in length in his CUNY Law Review article: The Chicago Police Torture Scandal: A Legal and Political History

Flint Taylor is a founding partner of the People’s Law Office in Chicago. He is one of the lawyers for the families of slain Black Panther leaders Fred Hampton and Mark Clark, and together with his law partner Jeffrey Haas was trial counsel in the marathon 1976 civil trial. He has also represented many survivors of Chicago police torture, and has done battle with the Chicago Police Department—and the Fraternal Order of Police—on numerous occasions over his 45 year career as a people’s lawyer.

 

You can read G. Flint Taylor’s piece in In These Times Here:

To Catch a Torturer: One Attorney’s 28-Year Pursuit of Racist Chicago Police Commander Jon Burge

You can read G. Flint Taylor’s CUNY Law Review Article Here:

The Chicago Police Torture Scandal: A Legal and Political History by G. Flint Taylor, founding partner, People’s Law Office (PLO).

EVENT: TRIANGLE SHIRTWAIST FACTORY TO RANA PLAZA

TRIANGLE SHIRTWAIST FACTORY TO RANA PLAZA: Building Movements for Labor Rights & Corporate Accountability

6PM, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8, 2015
CUNY School of Law, Room 1/202
2 Court Square
Long Island City, 11101

CUNY Law Review, in collaboration with the Labor Coalition, is hosting a compelling panel next week on labor rights and the garment industry.

Prof. Shirley Lung will be moderating the conversation
featuring:

Katherine Gallagher
Center for Constitutional Rights

Chaumtoli Huq
American Institute for Bangladesh Studies
(Skyping in from Bangladesh!)

Sophie DeBenedetto
National Mobilization Against Sweatshops

There will be a wine and hors-d’oeuvre reception following
the panel.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Please register at: bit.ly/shirtwaist2rana

The Seward Park Urban Renewal Area

The Seward Park Urban Renewal Area, Forty-five Years Later:
Affordable to Whom?

By Eugene Chen

I. Background

From the 1950s through the 1960s, two thousand families with low incomes were displaced from their homes when the City of New York embarked on an urban renewal plan targeting the area east along Delancey Street at the foot of the Williamsburg Bridge, otherwise known as the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area (SPURA).1 Forty-five years later, the “Seward Park Slum Clearance Project” left 165 million square feet of parking lot space, devoid of any signs of human occupation aside from the coming and going of vehicles. After a contentious community debate, the City Council passed a resolution (the “Resolution”) on October 11, 2012, for a mixed-use plan to develop SPURA.2 Proposals were due to the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) on May 6, 2013, and on September 18, 2013, Mayor Bloomberg announced that Delancey Street Associates LLC, a joint venture composed of L+M Development Partners, BFC Partners, and Taconic Investment Partners, had been selected to develop the site.3 The plan calls for 60/40 residential and commercial development, with 500 units of permanently affordable housing, out of the 1000 units of housing being built.4 In all likelihood, the developer chosen to develop SPURA will apply for the 421-a tax exemption, an incentive intended to encourage the construction of market-rate and affordable housing in New York City (the “City”).

The decision by the City to develop SPURA forty-five years later galvanized community groups and residents in Manhattan Community Board 3 (“CB3”), a neighborhood historically made up of low-income immigrants, who wanted to ensure that the project would benefit the community and not just enrich private developers.5 Though community boards did not exist6 when the City razed the area it deemed a “slum” in the 1960s, it was at community board meetings and hearings that the community voiced demands for more affordable housing, the construction of more schools in a burdened school district, prevailing wage jobs, and a ban on big-box stores in the plan for SPURA. This paper will examine the meaning of “affordability,” as defined by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development through the concept of Area Median Income, the alternative definition of affordability known as Local Median Income, and the role of the 421-a Real Property Tax Exemption in the creation of affordable housing.

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CUNITY Conversations: Toxic Sweatshops: Regulating the Import of Hazardous Electronics with Allie Robbins

Come join us for the fourth and final installment of our discussion series, CUNITY Conversations!

CUNITY Conversations is a discussion series designed to create discussion around a particular topic. It is an informal time to get together, hang out, and talk about a relevant social justice issue.

The next installment of the CUNITY Conversation series is Wednesday, April 1, from 1-2:45 pm, in the Community Room, 3/116.

Bring your lunch and join us for snacks plus great conversation discussing Allie Robbin’s article, “Toxic Sweatshops: Regulating the Import of Hazardous Electronics.”

The article discusses the rise in consumer use of personal electronic devices and how it has led to a boom in electronics manufacturing worldwide. Along with the expansion of production have come serious questions about the safety of production processes, as large numbers of workers and their children have become seriously ill. This article proposes that the United States, as a leading importer of electronic devices and components, create an Electronics Import Safety Commission to make sure that both workers and consumers are safe. This commission, modeled after the Consumer Protection Safety Commission, would monitor and regulate electronics manufacturing and would enhance transparency and accountability throughout the supply chain.

Join the dicussion on Twitter and Facebook on the hashtag #cunityconvo.

New Board Members Announced

Congratulations to the 2015 – 2016 CUNY Law Review Board!

Samuel Bruce
Elizabeth Vulaj
Digital Articles Editors

Hoda Mitwally
Executive Articles Editor

Jonathan Cantarero
Serena Newell
Chloe Serinsky
Notes & Comments Editors

Aubree D’Alfonso
Alanna Sakovits
Public Interest Practitioner Section (PIPS) Editors

Leonard Leveille
Special Events Editor

Jacqueline Meese
AJ Wipfler
Managing Articles Editors

Tom Power
Managing Editor

Alexandria E. Nedd
Editor-in-Chief

Storytelling Guantánamo: Using Creative Advocacy & Lawyering to Challenge Dominant Political and Media Narratives

WITH A SPECIAL DOCUMENTARY SCREENING OF WAITING FOR FAHD

CUNY Law Review, in collaboration with the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR), presents:

A CONVERSATION WITH
Omar Farah, Staff Attorney, CCR
Murtaza Hussain, Journalist, The Intercept
Professor Ramzi Kassem, Immigrant & Non-Citizen Rights Clinic
Aliya Hussain, Moderator, Advocacy Program Manager, CCR

STUDENT CONTRIBUTIONS
Andrew Adams & Syeda Tasnim
Immigrant & Non-Citizen Rights Clinic, Law & Security Docket

6PM, TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 2015
Reception at 6pm, panel begins at 6:30pm
CUNY School of Law, Community Room, 3/116
2 Court Square
Long Island City, 11101

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Please register at: bit.ly/storytelling-gtmo

CUNITY Conversations: Exploring Sex Work, Harm Reduction, and Housing Rights in NYC with Chelsea Breakstone & Zoë Root

Come join us for the third installment of our discussion series, CUNITY Conversations!

CUNITY Conversations is a discussion series designed to create discussion around a particular topic. The discussion leaders are the Law Review’s Note and Comments student authors, along with professors and practitioners. It is an informal time to get together, hang out, and talk about a relevant social justice issue.

The next installment of the CUNITY Conversation series is Wednesday, March 4, from 6-8pm, in the Community Room, 3/116.

Notes and Comments student author and 3L Chelsea Breakstone will be presenting “Exploring Sex Work, Harm Reduction, and Housing Rights in NYC,” along with Zoë Root, Staff Attorney and Human Trafficking Intervention Court Part Coordinator from The Bronx Defenders.

Join the dicussion on Twitter and Facebook on the hashtag #cunityconvo.

Vol. 17.2

Explore the digital version of  Volume 17.2.

Public Interest Practitioners Section (PIPS)

Notes & Comments 

Tax a Bank, Save a Home: Judicial, Legislative, and Other Creative Efforts to Prevent Foreclosures in New York by Erica Braudy, Staff Attorney at the New York Legal Assistance Group, Housing Project/Mobile Legal Help Center, J.D. CUNY School of Law (2013).

Executive Article

The Chicago Police Torture Scandal: A Legal and Political History by G. Flint Taylor, founding partner, People’s Law Office (PLO).

Essay

Discriminatory Maintenance of REO Properties as a Violation of the Federal Fair Housing Act by Stephen M. Dane, of the civil-rights law firm Relman, Dane & Colfax, PLLC; Tara Ramchandani, associate at Relman, Dane & Colfax, PLLC; and Anne P. Bellows, 2013 Relman Civil Rights Fellow.

Event

A Tribute to Justice: Honoring Forty Years of A Conversation with Struggle to Advance Judicial Process for Crimes Against Humanity in Chile with Judge Baltasar Garzón Real, internationally renowned Spanish jurist who issued the first detention request, through Interpol, for former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet on charges of abductions, torture, murder, forced disappearances and terrorism; Sir Geoffrey Bindman, QC, a British attorney specializing in human rights law who represented Amnesty International and Chilean victims’ interests in the case against Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet in the late 1990s; and Joan Garcés, a Spanish attorney who has made major contributions to international human rights law in the fight against impunity for heads of government who commit crimes against humanity. Moderated by Almudena Bernabeu, International Attorney for the Center for Justice and Accountability (CJA).

 

 

Video — The Long Crisis: Economic Inequality in New York City

The City University of New York Law Review presented The Long Crisis: Economic Inequality in New York City, on November 12, 2014, at the CUNY School of Law.

The Long Crisis reflected the theme of the Law Review’s 18th volume, which focuses on the role that economic inequality and injustice play within the context of social justice legal issues and practical solutions lawyers and activists are employing to help overcome the inequality.

The panel featured: Fahd Ahmed, acting executive director of DRUM—South Asian Organizing Center; Tom Angotti, professor of Urban Affairs and Planning and Director of the Hunter College Center for Community Planning and Development; Stanley Aronowitz, Distinguished Professor in the Ph.D. Program in Sociology at the CUNY Graduate Center; Jennifer Jones Austin, CEO and executive director of Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies; Shawn Blumberg, legal director of Housing Conservation Coordinators; and Robin Steinberg, founder and executive director of The Bronx Defenders.

Case Comment: United States v. Alvarez (2014)

Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been? Seriously, Let Me See Your GPS.

Warrantless Search of GPS Device Held Constitutional: United States v. Alvarez, 8:13-cr-009 (N.D.N.Y. 2014)

By Rajendra Persaud 1

            Technological advances continue to confound already dense fourth amendment jurisprudence. As modern devices become more powerful, the information stored and accessed within raises new issues that did not exist only a few decades ago. As such, new technological devices have the potential to create cases of first impression upon the courts. Recently, in U.S. v. Alvarez, Judge McAvoy ruled warrantless searches of cell phones unconstitutional in the absence of exigent circumstances or a need to protect officer safety.2 The opinion compared cell phones to modern computers3 that house a wealth of private information within4 (akin to personal residences5). Thus, the smart phones were granted protection similar to computer hard drives6 and all information obtained from the seized phones was suppressed.7

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